This week’s episode of The Adelaide Show, French Film Festival, celebrates that aspect of French cinema that is best captured in this quote by the charismatic actor Emmanuelle Beart: Very often with an American movie, the end is very happy and you just feel good when you go out. When you go to a French movie, it’s kind of like, oh!, and you can’t go out; you’re stuck in your chair. It goes so deeply inside of the heart.

Our guest is Dr Ben McCann, Associate Professor and Head of French Studies at the University of Adelaide.

Another special guest is Steven Marshall and Stephen Marschall.

This week, the SA Drink Of The Week is a wine from France!

In IS IT NEWS, Nigel challenges us on stories about French cinema.

In 100 Weeks Ago, we take you back to our interview with Alisson and Peter Marsland, parents of the late, Richard Marsland, who took his own life in 2008 after a heightening struggle with depression.

And in the musical pilgrimage … Todd has a song by Wing Defence.

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Running Sheet: French Film Festival

TIME SEGMENT
00:00:00 Outtake
French cricket
00:00:28
Theme
Theme and Introduction. Our original theme song in full is here, Adelaidey-hoo.
00:02:38 SA Drink Of The Week
2012 L’Escalier au Ciel Merlot from France … tasting notes.
00:06:00 Stories Without Notice

Stephen Marschall has found his friends are taking more interest in him these days, since the South Australian election on March 17. Steve caught up with him for a quick chat this week to find out more.

Also, in going through some old files and recordings, Steve found a long lost chat recorded in 2013, just a few weeks after the other Steven Marshall became then Opposition Leader of the South Australian Liberals. We have a small snippet of it here, because it shows a relaxed Steven Marshall, sharing the microphone with Fringe star, Barry Morgan And His Organ, being interviewed by John Murch.

There we have it. Steven didn’t want to conduct the brass band but now he gets to wave his arms around to conduct South Australia. Let’s see how he goes.

00:12:54 Associate Professor Ben McCann

Dr Ben McCann, is Associate Professor and Head of French Studies at the University of Adelaide, and he welcome Honours and PhD proposals on any area of French cinema. So, tonight, sitting at the Palace Nova Cinema with the French Film Festival all around us, we’ll see if we can create an intellectual aesthetic that will move his passions and leave you in tears of joy.

I would like to start with a quote from Emmanuelle Beart: Very often with an American movie, the end is very happy and you just feel good when you go out. When you go to a French movie, it’s kind of like, oh!, and you can’t go out; you’re stuck in your chair. It goes so deeply inside of the heart. WHY IS THIS SO?

How much do we lose by reading subtitles?

Take us back to the beginning. What came first in your life, cinema, or French cinema

What attracts you to French 1930s cinema, set design and decor?

The 1935 film, Golgotha, by Julien Duvivier, has a long panning shot over Jerusalem. Really long, approximately five minutes. See You Up There, starts with an amazing tracking shot out into the battlefields of WW! Is this a French hallmark?

What is significant about the development of the French horror film?

An old boss I once worked with, loave Jacques Tati’s films. I have never seen one in its entirety, only clips on YouTube. Were they all silent and relying on slapstick in highly stylised sets?

The ‘horror’ and ‘comedy’ film genre, Is Delicatessan one of these films?

the French New Wave, developments in French New Millennium Cinema

Gaspar Noe is an Argentinian, I believe, who makes films in France and is the type who pushes boundaries, such as with his 3D movie called Love. He says, “The French movies that are promoted abroad are the ones that give a trendy, cultural, petit bourgeois, upper class image of France, but it’s true that people who are poor in France are the same in New York or in India.” Are we given a false aesthetic of French life in most movies?

What would be the Australian equivalent of movies we export – what would go, what would stay?

Normandy Nude. People in a small town need to pose nude for a calendar to save their town. I usually expect our films copy French films, not the other way around. Are French movie makers as guilty of plagiarism as ours are?

How should we prepare ourselves for films at the Festival?

01:21:28 Is It News?

Nigel Dobson-Keeffe challenges the panel to pick the fake story from three stories from South Australia’s past.

 

01:36:11 100 Weeks Ago
We opened the vault to go back 100 weeks to the chat with had with Alisson and Peter Marsland, parents of the late, Richard Marsland, who took his own life in 2008 after a heightening struggle with depression. One of the profound and important things from that interview was the sentiment they shared towards the end of the interview.
01:40:51 Musical Pilgrimage
And our song this week is Stuck by Wing Defence, selected by our musical curator, Todd Fischer.
01:49:29 Outtake
 You have a French top on … Toast our queen … Blame the French wine

Here is this week’s preview video:

SFX: Throughout the podcast we use free sfx from freesfx.co.uk for the harp, the visa stamp, the silent movie music, the stylus, the radio signal sfx, the wine pouring and cork pulling sfx, and the swooshes around Siri.

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