In this week’s episode of The Adelaide Show, we chat Irma and Elise from The Little Dutch House about Sinterklass, Black Peters, and Poffertjes, along with many other curiosities from The Netherlands.

Also this week, the SA Drink Of The Week is from Sunlight Liquor and it has a link to Jon Bon Jovi’s visit to Adelaide this week.

Our new sponsor, Adelaide Night And Day Family Therapy, continues tonight, with principal, Brett Williams, discussing couples and communication.

And in the Musical Pilgrimage, we have a Christmas song from Michael Mills, the man who produces Professor Flint.

We might also be able to put a phone call into Santa before the show’s end.

Tickets on sale now for Steve’s 2019 Adelaide Fringe Show – 2 Cat’s On A Hot Fringe Roof. Please buy some, especially the dinner and show ticket because it enters you into a great, wine-loving draw.

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Running Sheet: I’m dream of a Dutch Christmas

TIME SEGMENT
00:00:00 Intro
00:00:08 SA Drink Of The Week
Sunlight Liquor Gums ‘n’ Roses Sparkling Australian Mead. Tasting notes┬ácoming Sunday.
00:07:52 Mindful Moment with Adelaide Night and Day Family Therapy
In this week’s Mindful Moment, principal of Adelaide Night and Day Family Therapy, Brett Williams, explains what is meant by communication in the life of couples.
00:12:04 Irma and Elise from The Little Dutch House

At the time this episode comes out, which will be late on December 5, Dutch children around the world will have been putting out shoes or even getting gifts because it is St Nicholas’ Eve. So, to help us unwrap the wonder of a Dutch Xmas, we’ve turned to Irma and Elise from The Little Dutch House.

We’re going to be talking about your market stall and Dutch food in just a moment but first, I want to get some clarity about Dutch Christmas and its various traditions.

I’ve read that the second Saturday in November is when Dutch Xmas kicks off. What happens on that day?

Let’s turn to December 5 and 6. One of our long time listeners, Janis Littleton, said, “My kids are leaving their shoes out on December 5th… As, if they are good, Saint Nicholas leaves chocolate in them on the 6th. He tends to get it from Red Cacao. ­čśť” Is that pretty close to most modern Dutch households?

Why shoes? Doesn’t that make gifts smelly?

Sinterklass comes from Spain? Is that because the North Pole is too close to home?

Sinterklass has some intriguing helpers known as Zwarte Pieten or Black Peters. What are they and what do they do?

I read the original Sinterklass didn’t have Black Peters but was himself considered a bogeyman to scare children into good behaviours but in the 19th Century, some priests and teachers were worried about their Good Saint coming across all heavy. Is that true?

How do we make sense of Black Peters in this era where we realise how offensive Blackface is to many people?

And Janis also made a comment worth discussing: “I’d prefer to confront a Zwarte Pieten and his switch stick, than a Krampus any day!” Krampus is a pretty nasty half-goat, half-demon from Central Europe who punished kids who were bad, as opposed to St Nicholas who rewarded the good ones. Do you have any thoughts as to why European cultures came up with such ghastly characters?

There is a stern characteristic to the Dutch personality: pleasant and efficient but swift and cross if you break rank. Are you both like that? Are your fellow Dutch brethren like that?

Do you think this pragmatic aspect of the Dutch character is why you can be okay with prostitution in the red light district and early legalisation of marijuana?

Now, from the Fullarton markets, to the Henley markets, and even the Campbelltown Moonlight Markets over the past year, you two have been selling Dutch treats from your stall, The Little Dutch House. What has driven you to do this?

What is the significance of Poffertjes? How are they different from other pancakes?

You have some pretty delicious cakes too.

What other Dutch treats do you love or hate?

Listener and occasional guest on the podcast, Robert Godden wrote: Pfeffernusse. Speculaas. Those almondy things shaped like a large table. That is the Dutch contribution to the world, and it is sufficient.

How do you wish Merry Christmas in Dutch?

01:13:30 Musical Pilgrimage
In the musical pilgrimage, we have a Xmas song from Michael Mills called Rollercoaster.
Several years ago, Michael wrote an original show, “Santa’s Christmas Dream”, and performed with with Father Christmas and the folk from the Australian Classical Youth Ballet. That show has now been adapted for a visual projection by the folk from Illuminart and will be shown at Rouse Hill, Sydney from December 13 until Christmas. Santa’s Magic Sleigh is one of the tracks from the Santa’s Christmas Dream mini album available on CD Baby. Given there’s still a week before promotion and hoo hah erupts around this event that attracts tens of thousands of Australians, you could say we are getting an exclusive advanced listen to on of the tracks from Michael’s original show. Ho ho ho!

Here is this week’s preview video:

SFX: Throughout the podcast we use free sfx from freesfx.co.uk for the harp, the visa stamp, the silent movie music, the stylus, the radio signal sfx, the wine pouring and cork pulling sfx, and the swooshes around Siri.

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